Forthcoming 2017.  

CD Jewel Case photography.

Migrant Tales, the fourth release from the UK folk/rock band The Nelson Brothers.

nelsonbrothers.co.uk

Nelson #1.JPG
Nelson #2.JPG

Commercial Applications

The artist is happy to discuss creating prints on different surfaces and in different sizes when working in collaboration with art consultants, architects, and interior designers.

To acquire about exhibit or license the images, or to discuss collaborating on upcoming projects, contact the artist directly. Thank You

 
 

Winter 2017 issue & Summer 2017 issue of Midwestern Gothic.

This fine literary magazine is available through booksellers, online, or from Midwestern Gothic.

"Greenwood Cemetery" graces the title page.

This fine literary magazine is available through booksellers, online, or from Midwestern Gothic.

 

2014     Solo Exhibition in Goshen, Indiana, in conjuction with the opening of the independent award winning documentary film "Medora"

The depressed farming community of Medora, Ind., is the focus of the often-somber documentary appropriately titled "Medora." The film, directed by Andrew Cohn and Davy Rothbart, works as an earnest snapshot of a certain kind of small town that's struggling to exist amid economic downturns, shuttered workplaces and a stultifying lack of hope or progress. It's a sad commentary about people and places that get left behind — the wholesale disappearance of the American dream. "Medora," which counts actors Steve Buscemi and Stanley Tucci among its executive producers, follows members of the town's hapless high school basketball team over the course of a single school year. These players can't quite break their team's longtime losing streak, something that's perhaps as attributable to the kids' hardscrabble existences as it is to their hoop skills (that it's the state's fifth-smallest public high school also minimizes the possible pool of athletic talent).

The depressed farming community of Medora, Ind., is the focus of the often-somber documentary appropriately titled "Medora." The film, directed by Andrew Cohn and Davy Rothbart, works as an earnest snapshot of a certain kind of small town that's struggling to exist amid economic downturns, shuttered workplaces and a stultifying lack of hope or progress.

It's a sad commentary about people and places that get left behind — the wholesale disappearance of the American dream.

"Medora," which counts actors Steve Buscemi and Stanley Tucci among its executive producers, follows members of the town's hapless high school basketball team over the course of a single school year. These players can't quite break their team's longtime losing streak, something that's perhaps as attributable to the kids' hardscrabble existences as it is to their hoop skills (that it's the state's fifth-smallest public high school also minimizes the possible pool of athletic talent).