David McCleery Photography


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3/2018 Migrant TalesCD Jewel Case Photography for

The Nelson Brothers, folk-rock group out of the UK.


Upcoming

Solo Exhibition

Forthcoming:

The photo exhibition "Summer Abandoned" will be presented in the State of Nebraska Governor's Residence Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska. Dates to be determined.  Support provided by the Nebraska Arts Council.

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  Writing    Forthcoming:    David's short story, "The Drowned" scheduled to appear early fall of 2018 in  The Flat Water Rises: An Anthology of Short Fiction by Emerging Nebraska Writers,  WSC Press.

Writing

Forthcoming:

David's short story, "The Drowned" scheduled to appear early fall of 2018 in The Flat Water Rises: An Anthology of Short Fiction by Emerging Nebraska Writers, WSC Press.


                 Summer Abandoned, Lifeguard Chair, Pinhole Photography, 2018                          See new image portfolio.  Click on "Summer Abandoned" tab

               Summer Abandoned, Lifeguard Chair, Pinhole Photography, 2018       

               See new image portfolio.  Click on "Summer Abandoned" tab

                  Summer Abandoned, Dream House, Webster County Nebraska, 2018                                                 Pinhole Landscape Photography

                Summer Abandoned, Dream House, Webster County Nebraska, 2018

                                             Pinhole Landscape Photography

 JULY 20, 2012  •  BY CORY MATTESON /LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR   DENTON -- Despite forcing himself out of bed at 5 a.m. or so, David McCleery didn’t have much of a plan for when he arrived at the Spring Creek Prairie Audubon Center on Thursday morning.  This trip was mostly a reconnaissance mission, he said as he carried a Hasselblad 501-cm camera mounted to a tripod over his shoulder and walked along the trail. “I don’t hunt, so, in a sense, it’s a way to do that,” he said.  McCleery started to get into photography only 2 1/2 years ago. “Really, I’m just trying to do photos that please myself,” he said. And if others enjoy them, he said, even better. Earlier this month, he received an email that confirmed that a panel of judges with ties to National Geographic, Time, the New York Times and a host of other international publications, were fond of his work. McCleery submitted a photo in the amateur landscape photography competition of the Paris-based Prix de la Photographie (Px3). The email told him he had won, and invited him to fly to France for the awards ceremony. He didn’t bother to look up the cost of a last-minute flight, but was nonetheless excited to have won.  McCleery shot the winning photo, which was of seven black-and-white trees on the horizon of the cloud-covered Nine-Mile Prairie in northwest Lincoln, last February. He entered just the one photo, compared to the photographers who placed silver and bronze, who each submitted multiple shots of their subjects. It was not lost on him that his stark interpretation of the still Nebraska plains somehow bested the silver-medal subject, the Matterhorn.  “You can go right to the edge of Lincoln and take a photograph that’s appreciated,” he said.  So far, he has done them with considerable limitations. He shoots with black-and-white film only, with one lens (an 80 millimeter) and develops them in a darkroom at his house. He’s only begun to experiment with a second camera, of the handmade pinhole variety, which is even more primitive than his first.   “It’s a way to really slow down the process,” he said, and he’s OK with slow. He ventured to Nine-Mile Prairie five times before capturing the shot he wanted. He took his favorite photograph, an image of the Roca grain elevator, after it caught his eye on crack-of-dawn drives. One day he decided to set up his camera across from it and take a 3 1/2-minute long exposure of it at 4 a.m. “It’s as lovely as anything you can find in the world,” he said.

JULY 20, 2012  •

BY CORY MATTESON /LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR

 DENTON -- Despite forcing himself out of bed at 5 a.m. or so, David McCleery didn’t have much of a plan for when he arrived at the Spring Creek Prairie Audubon Center on Thursday morning.

This trip was mostly a reconnaissance mission, he said as he carried a Hasselblad 501-cm camera mounted to a tripod over his shoulder and walked along the trail. “I don’t hunt, so, in a sense, it’s a way to do that,” he said.

McCleery started to get into photography only 2 1/2 years ago. “Really, I’m just trying to do photos that please myself,” he said. And if others enjoy them, he said, even better. Earlier this month, he received an email that confirmed that a panel of judges with ties to National Geographic, Time, the New York Times and a host of other international publications, were fond of his work. McCleery submitted a photo in the amateur landscape photography competition of the Paris-based Prix de la Photographie (Px3). The email told him he had won, and invited him to fly to France for the awards ceremony. He didn’t bother to look up the cost of a last-minute flight, but was nonetheless excited to have won.

McCleery shot the winning photo, which was of seven black-and-white trees on the horizon of the cloud-covered Nine-Mile Prairie in northwest Lincoln, last February. He entered just the one photo, compared to the photographers who placed silver and bronze, who each submitted multiple shots of their subjects. It was not lost on him that his stark interpretation of the still Nebraska plains somehow bested the silver-medal subject, the Matterhorn.  “You can go right to the edge of Lincoln and take a photograph that’s appreciated,” he said.

So far, he has done them with considerable limitations. He shoots with black-and-white film only, with one lens (an 80 millimeter) and develops them in a darkroom at his house. He’s only begun to experiment with a second camera, of the handmade pinhole variety, which is even more primitive than his first.

 “It’s a way to really slow down the process,” he said, and he’s OK with slow. He ventured to Nine-Mile Prairie five times before capturing the shot he wanted. He took his favorite photograph, an image of the Roca grain elevator, after it caught his eye on crack-of-dawn drives. One day he decided to set up his camera across from it and take a 3 1/2-minute long exposure of it at 4 a.m. “It’s as lovely as anything you can find in the world,” he said.

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                 Tom Mix (Shades of the movie Coco?)

My wife and I pass by the Tom Mix Memorial frequently.  It lies on the long lonely desert Highway 79 between Florence and Catalina, Arizona.  One overcast afternoon we took the time to stop at the spot where he died in a car wreck in 1940.  Oddly enough this image was taken with the 1940's Argoflex, a popular camera of that time.

Tom Mix was the greatest of the silent-era movie cowboys, and a cowboy in real-life as well. He reportedly could knock a button off of a shirt with a rifle shot, and jump a horse into a railroad box car. He was married seven times to six different women.

But Tom was 60 years old on October 12, 1940, and behind the wheel of a V8 convertible, not in a saddle, when he decided to race north across the Arizona desert to visit his son-in-law. No one knows how fast he was going when he saw the road repair crew, but some say that he was standing straight up on the brakes, trying to stop, when his car flew into the washed-out gully. Tom's aluminum suitcase was thrown out of the back seat and into the back of Tom's head (He was wearing his trademark 10-gallon white Stetson at the time). Mix emerged apparently unscathed from the car -- which was not badly damaged -- took one step, and crumpled, dead of a broken neck.



 

David McCleery is a Nebraska, writer, publisher, and musician. Through his photography, music, and writing, David seeks to nurture in himself and others the concept of creative work as a means to a rich and full exploratory life.  He works full-time at his creative interests and lives in Lincoln, Nebraska, with his wife, Robin.  They spend part of the year just north of Tucson in Oro Valley, Arizona, near the Santa Catalina Mountains.

Photography:

David works in medium format and 35mm based film. 

He uses black and white film in handmade and historic cameras.

Solo Exhibitions:

Forthcoming:  With support from the Nebraska Arts Council, the photo exhibition "Summer Abandoned" will be presented in the State of Nebraska Governor's Residence Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska. Dates to be determined.

2014     Goshen Art House, Goshen, Indiana, in conjunction with the independent award-winning documentary film  "Medora."

2013      Fred Simon Gallery at the Nebraska Arts Council, Omaha, Nebraska
2012     "Close Proximity" County-City Building, Lincoln, Nebraska
              
Group Exhibitions:    
2018     The Willa Cather Foundation, Red Cloud Opera House, Red Cloud, Nebraska

2016      The Willa Cather Foundation, Red Cloud Opera House Gallery, Red Cloud, Nebraska

2015     The Willa Cather Foundation, Red Cloud Opera House Gallery, Red Cloud, Nebraska

2013     Fortunate Land: The Legacy of O Pioneers!  The Willa Cather Foundation, Red Cloud, Nebraska

2012     NVAL International Juried Photography Show, Carter House Gallery, Redding California

Permanent Collections:

Willa Cather Foundation Art Collection

Publications:

February 2018             Midwestern Gothic Winter 2018

November 2017          Willa Cather Review Fall 2017

August 2017               Midwestern Gothic Summer 2017

February 2017             Midwestern Gothic Winter 2017

February 2017             Px3 (Paris Photo Prize) 2012 Annual publication of Medal Award                                             Winning photographs

Awards:
2012 Gold Medal Fine Art Landscape, Prix de la Photographie, Paris (Paris Photo Prize)

2012 IPA International Photography Awards, Honorable Mention, Fine Art, Landscapes

Album Covers/CD Jewel Case  Photography:

2018   Migrant Tales, the fourth release from the UK folk-rock band The Nelson Brothers


The artist is happy to discuss creating prints on different surfaces and in different sizes when working in collaboration with publishers, musicians, art consultants, architects, and interior designers.

To acquire about exhibit or license the images, or to discuss collaborating on upcoming projects, contact the artist directly. Thank You, Dave

  Portraits:   Inquire on the contact page for reservations for one of a kind classic black and white film based portraits of your friends and family.

Portraits:

Inquire on the contact page for reservations for one of a kind classic black and white film based portraits of your friends and family.

                                                                 Young Explorer

                                                               Young Explorer



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